Talking Point: Will FDI benefit foreign universities in India

Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) proposed in Budget 2020 is expected to benefit Indian varsities. A strong strategy will make it mutually beneficial

Joint centres of excellence

The introduction of FDI will aid infrastructural development in universities and they would gain expertise and create a competitive environment. This will augment the overall offerings in the education sector. Given the regulatory concern, the latest government move can only encourage foreign universities to invest in a collaborative manner to co-create centres of excellence particular in executive education, skill development and technical education. These centres can operate on revenue-generating mode.

— D0heeraj P Sharma, director, IIM-Rohtak


Foreign investors will benefit too


Allowing FDI will increase competition in the Indian education market and will leverage qualitative outcomes. It will benefit the students by providing them access to the high-quality faculty and research facilities, while faculties would have the opportunities to work on frontier areas. Foreign universities are eyeing Indian markets due to favourable demographics and rising per capita income.

—Navneet Sharma, dean, School of Business, VijayBhoomi University


Boosting prospects

FDI will be a boon for the education sector as the cash pumped into this sector can be used towards enhancing the infrastructure, quality education and improving the pedagogies. The government’s focus on increasing GER will also boost the prospects of foreign universities. Moreover, the nascent e-learning platform will provide a potential market for foreign universities in India.

—Pradeepta Sethi, associate professor, T A Pai Management Institute, Manipal

Stake in Indian institutes


Currently, a foreign university cannot run independently in India. FDI will enable foreign schools to have a stake in Indian varsities in terms of their investments. It will allow a school within the university to run in association with a foreign school. For instance, any Indian institute can now hope to have a School of Business run by Harvard.

— Atish Chattopadhyay, director, IFIM Business School, Bengaluru

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Updated: February 10, 2020 — 9:45 am